Monday, April 25, 2016

Diction, Syntax, and Community in the Writings of Wendell Berry

Diction, Syntax, and Community in the Writings of Wendell Berry
The manner in which people speak says much about them. Speech patterns can indicate everything from age to region of origin, level of education and socio-economic status to religious ideology, and much more. People’s choices of words are referred to as diction and how they order these words is known as syntax. Diction and syntax combine to give a person a unique voice. Authors utilize this fact to create literature that is incisive and lasting, and Wendell Berry is a perfect example. In his Port William writings, Berry utilizes the tools of diction and syntax in order to explore the inherent tensions in and vast opportunities of living in human community.

Friday, April 22, 2016

Unashamed

UnashamedUnashamed by Lecrae Moore
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Lecrae is an interesting person, and this is an interesting book. I have been ministered to greatly by the artists of Reach, including Lecrae. Contrary to the many who have seen his progression as a move away from faith, I have been encouraged by his evolution from youth group rapper to frontline missionary. I have also enjoyed listening to his music as it has progressed greatly from Rebel to CC3 (I wasn't around for Real Talk, I'm a band-wagoner).

In Unashamed, Lecrae tells his story. It is a story that many young, black men are living, but it is still a story to which all can relate. He tells of growing up fatherless, enduring physical, emotional, and sexual abuse. living in San Diego with gangs and north Dallas without many people who shared his color and culture. He tells about his struggles with drugs and alcohol, his pressuring a girl to have an abortion, and his desires to end his life. But through it all, he tells the story of a great God that had a plan and a purpose for Lecrae Moore.

And his struggles did not end when he became a believer. What I found most encouraging, probably because it was more relatable to me than being a fatherless black boy on the streets of San Diego, were his struggles after becoming a believer. His immature interactions with unbelievers, his legalistic and self-righteous deeds to improve his status with God, his difficulty in being a loving (see: gentle and respectful) husband, the persecution from within the visible church he endured when following the Lord in a manner that didn't match their expectations, etc., all are struggles to which I can relate to one degree or another. And seeing how he endured them, moved past them, and used them as means to love God more was a great encouragement.

Lecrae lays himself bare, and he does so to the glory of God. He doesn't glorify his sins or his struggles, as so many radical testimonies often do. He doesn't credit himself with his successes and salvation. He doesn't encourage people to follow him (seriously, there are more than enough Lecratians, already). Rather, he looks back and recognizes that he was chief of sinners and that sin cost the Lord his life; that he was saved and blessed by the glorious, unmerited, undeserved, immeasurable grace of God; and he points away from himself and towards the person of Christ and says, "Follow him! Honor him! Praise and glorify him!"

If you love hip-hop, pick this book up. If you love rags-to-riches success stories, pick this book up. If you love hearing someone extol the virtues of our great God from the first page to the last, definitely pick this book up. You'll be glad you did.

I received an ARC from the publisher through NetGalley.
View all my reviews

Monday, April 11, 2016

The Doctrine of the Trinity

The Doctrine of the Trinity

            There is a constant and persistent temptation in Christian circles to pine for the days gone by.  Whether this is an unhealthy yearning for the pure Christianity of the reign of the religious right, an overwhelming urge to sit in a pub with Luther, Zwingli, and Calvin while they wax poetic over proper and pure theology, or head back to the time of Augustine because those guys had everything down.  The most pervasive example of this is the longing to return to the time of Acts 2 church purity.  This misguided nostalgia misses the blemishes that have filled every age of church history and, in doing so, misses the consistent work of the Spirit of God in and on his people.  While this nostalgic position assumes that the early church enjoyed flawless and full theology, actual history highlights how difficult a road the brothers and sisters in the early church walked as they sought to properly understand the Scriptures and worship God.  The doctrine of the Trinity is a perfect example of this.  Rather than floating down from heaven engraved on stone shamrocks, this doctrine was formulated over many years and through much adversity. The doctrine of the Trinity has been under constant and consistent assault throughout the history of the church because of its status as proper representation of God and the blessing it is to believers.  

Friday, April 8, 2016

How I Changed my Mind About Evolution: Review

How I Changed My Mind about Evolution: Evangelicals Reflect on Faith and ScienceHow I Changed My Mind about Evolution: Evangelicals Reflect on Faith and Science by Kathryn Applegate
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

How I Changed my Mind About Evolution is not an apologetic for evolutionary theory. It is a collection of essays recounting the contributors' personal struggles in reconciling Christian faith and the natural sciences. For what it is, this book is as good as it is needed, and I lack the repertoire of superlatives necessary to properly convey how strongly I feel about how needed this book is.

The essays in this book range from pretty good to first-rate. I thought Smith's essay to open and Mouw's to close were the two best. Crisp's and Wright's were also especially helpful. I had a mixed reaction to some of the essays. I shook my head at some of the theological statements. I shook my head at some of the scientific statements. I shook my head at some of the things that made me shake my head. (I can get ramped up over peripherals much too quickly/often.) This book has contributions from a wide range of denominations, so if your one of those types who too rarely round the corner of his own personal, ideological ghetto (Me! Me!), then you should prepare to be annoyed at times. But it is a good annoyance...and a needed one.

I am swimming against the stream of my personal circle in daring to advocate something connected with Biologos...or even something that has the audacity to be any more nuanced than Darwin=Devil. But too many have been driven away from the Christian faith by a novel litmus test of orthodoxy that doesn't find its basis explicitly in the Scriptures or in the creeds for me to not offer some sort of pushback. This is a conversation worth having and one that deserves more light and less heat than it has been given. This book will not change minds. But it does shed a lot of light on the issue from the evolutionary creation position and will be a benefit to many, even if it just to let people know that science and faith are not mortal enemies and this conversation is not as closed as many would be led to believe.

My encouragement: if your immediate, visceral response to the idea of evolution is disgust, then you may be encountering a bogeyman that owes its existence to fear mongering rather than a genuine foe. Consider listening to the story of brothers and sisters who love Jesus, affirm the Scriptures, and hold to some sort of evolutionary theory. It will only benefit the Body to know why certain parts believe what they do.


I received an ARC from the publisher in exchange for a review.


View all my reviews

Monday, April 4, 2016

Diversity in Puritanism

Diversity in Puritanism

It is hard to overvalue the impact of Puritanism on Christian theology and living, as well as on western culture in general. However, Puritanism is not a monolithic brand of Reformed Christianity. Puritan scholar Randall Pederson notes that the fact “(t)hat there was vibrant diversity among the Reformed theologians of the seventeenth century on various aspects of their doctrine seems without question.”[1] There is great diversity and debate found within the realm of Puritanism that labelling it as an “ism” or speaking of the Puritans can be tricky and misleading. Far from being a detriment, part of what has caused the Puritans to be so beneficial is how widely applicable they are due to this diversity in secondary matters coupled with unanimity on core doctrines and Christian living. Puritanism, as a movement, held within it many diverse understandings of the nuances and peripherals of Christian theology and its application to Christian living, but there remained an overarching catholicity that included, more but not less than, an overwhelming emphasis on a Christian life marked by experiential piety.